Linux Articles listed under "Ubuntu USB Boot CD"

Make a USB Boot CD for Ubuntu 11.10

Creating a USB Boot CD that can be used to boot your Ubuntu Live 11.10 USB Flash Drive from a PC or Mac with a BIOS that doesn't natively support booting from a USB device (USB drivers are loaded from CD). I used a Macbook Pro to test this tutorial. This process is similar to our older USB Boot CD for Ubuntu tutorial, with new requirements added to make it work with 11.10. A boot menu option has been included for booting from a Macbook (forcing bypass of the Nouveau nVidia drivers, which do not play well with a Macbook.).

Read the rest of this entry…

Make a USB Boot CD for Ubuntu 9.10 or 10.04

How to create a USB Boot CD that can be used to boot your Ubuntu Live USB Flash Drive from a computer with a BIOS that doesn't support booting from USB. The USB Boot CD you create via this tutorial will contain the USB drivers necessary to open a USB connection. GRUB is used to launch initrd (Initial Ram Filesystem) from the CD.  The Initial Ram Filesystem then locates the squash filesystem and persistent casper-rw persistence block file on the USB device and proceeds to boot the Live USB Persistent environment.

Read the rest of this entry…

Make a USB Boot CD for Ubuntu 9.04

The following tutorial explains how to create a USB Boot CD that can be used to boot a Ubuntu 9.04 USB flash drive on computers with a BIOS that does not natively support booting from USB. The boot CD contains a grub bootloader that loads the initrd and vmlinuz kernel from the CD and then proceeds to locate the filesystem on the USB drive. Because the USB driver modules are preloaded from the initrd on the CD, the compressed filesystem can then be detected and loaded from the USB device.

Read the rest of this entry…

Make a USB Boot CD for Ubuntu 8.10

This USB Boot CD can be used to boot a Ubuntu 8.10 USB flash drive on computers with a BIOS that does not natively support booting from USB. The boot CD contains a grub bootloader that loads the initrd and vmlinuz kernel from the CD and then proceeds to locate the filesystem on the USB flash drive. Because the USB drivers are preloaded from the initrd on the CD, the USB flash drive can then easily be detected.

Read the rest of this entry…