Linux Articles listed under "qemu"

All In One Pendrivelinux 2008

This ALL In One version of Pendrivelinux 2008 can be run from a USB thumbdrive either natively (as a stand alone Operating System at boot), or within Windows using qemu emulation. Moreover, the user can save installed software, changes, bookmarks, email, contacts and more automatically via a persistent loop image and then restore those changes upon subsequent qemu or native boots. This is a major breakthrough as the user can now run Pendrivelinux 2008 from a USB device even if the computer cannot natively boot from USB and still save changes persistently to be restored regardless of whether booting natively or from qemu.

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How to make Ubuntu 7.04 Casper Persistent

Making a casper persistent Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn): Since the initial release of Ubuntu 7.04, much of the portable linux community has been eager to run Ubuntu 7.04 persistently from a USB device or emulated using Qemu. It only makes sense that we should be able to save and restore settings changes via a persistent partition or img (image). In the following tutorial, we are simply re-enabling the old casper system.

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Run any Live Linux CD from within Windows

Normally, the tutorials featured here pertain to running Linux from a USB flash pen drive or other portable USB device. However, this tutorial explains how to run that Live Linux CD/DVD you might have sitting around from within Windows using Qemu Emulation. That's right, you can run a Live Linux CD using your CD/DVD drive from your windows desktop without rebooting. The advantages are two fold. You can run Linux on top of Windows from a CD or DVD without any installation to another storage media. In addition, this process eliminates the need to restart your PC and set your BIOS options to boot Linux from CD or USB.

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Boot any Linux ISO from USB in Windows

The following tutorial explains how to use Qemu to boot any Linux ISO version from a portable USB flash device while still working within Windows 98, 2000, NT, XP and Vista. This Enables the user to have both systems running at the same time eliminating the need to restart the PC and set your BIOS options to boot Linux from USB.

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