Using and Configuring Linux Category - Page 2

Install proprietary Nvidia or ATI drivers for Debian or Ubuntu

The following tutorial is for Debian or Ubuntu users who are looking to install proprietary drivers for their ATI or Nvidia video card. Installation of proprietary ATI or Nvidia video card drivers will allow you to take full advantage of all the 3d capabilities your Video card may have to offer. In this tutorial, we will be using a script called "envy" created by Alberto Milone.

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How to change the Debian Menu Icon

The following tutorial covers the process of changing the default Debian Menu Icon to a custom Icon and in addition change the Debian Menu name. This is for those of us that prefer to use a pure Debian Linux Operating environment or a remix that is based on Debian. This process was tested using a clean install of Debian Etch. Other Debian releases may vary.

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Changing the Ubuntu Start Menu Panel Icon

The following tutorial covers the process of changing or replacing the Gnome start menu panel icon with your own custom gnome panel icon. Enabling you to customize the look of your Ubuntu. The process was tested using Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon but should work with previous versions just as well.

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Ubuntu Desktop Effects – Fixing the missing titlebar

The following tutorial explains how to fix the Compiz Ubuntu Desktop Effects missing titlebar problem. If you've been toying around with Ubuntu 7.04 and have enabled Desktop Effects "Compiz", you might notice that the titlebar or window decorations have disappeared. This is a fairly common problem amongst systems using ATI or Nvidia video cards and commonly occurs after switching to a higher resolution. The fix is fairly simple.

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Ubuntu – Remove the prompt to eject CD

How to remove the Ubuntu eject CD prompt. The following tutorial covers the process of removing the "Please remove the disk, close the tray (if any) and press ENTER to continue" prompt entirely from your USB Ubuntu installation. The process is fairly simple and will allow your system to shutdown or restart without prompting you to remove the CD. Those of us booting from a USB stick, will surely be glad to get rid of the remove CD annoyance.

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Ubuntu toram – How to make Ubuntu Boot to Ram

This tutorial explains how to fix the Boot to Ram or "toram" feature that is currently broken in Ubuntu 7.04. Boot to Ram will enable a user to copy the entire Ubuntu live environment to system ram and run the Ubuntu Operating System entirely from there. You can then remove the CD or USB device and continue to do your work from system memory. BootToRam is also commonly referred to as CopyToRam.

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How to open a tar file in Unix or Linux

A lot of the downloadable Linux or Unix files found on the internet are compressed using a tar or tar.gz compression format. So, knowing how to open or untar these compressed files becomes very important. In the following examples, we will explain how to untar both popular formats and how to extract the contents to a different directory.

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How to make Totem Media Player play encrypted DVD's

The following tutorial covers the process of making Totem Media Player play encrypted DVD's. This tutorial assumes that your using Debian Linux or a distro based purely on Debian. It will allow you to have your own Debian DVD portable media center. If your getting error messages like the following, this tutorial is for you:

Totem could not play 'dvd:/ There is no plugin to handle this movie.

An error occurred: The source seems encrypted, and can't be read. Are you trying to play an encrypted DVD without libdvdcss?

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How to Upgrade from Etch to Lenny

How do I upgrade from Debian Etch to Lenny? The other day, one of our subscribers had asked us just that. Upgrading to a newer version of Debian is actually relatively simple and for the most part, can be done in very short time with just a few quick steps. So if you have Debian Linux installed on your PC and are eager to try out Lenny, go grab yourself a Soda and read on.

Please note that this tutorial assumes that your upgrading from a local hard drive installation of Debian Etch (This wont work on a compressed file-system)

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How to add a user to the sudoers list

How to add a user to the sudoers list? Beleive it or not, this is a fairly common question and in all reality the answer is quite simple. Adding a user to the sudoers list on a fully installed Linux system such as Debian is only possible via the command visudo. Users in the sudoers list are allowed the privileges to run commands and open files as the root user. In the following quick tutorial, we will show you how adding a new sudoer is quickly done.

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How to open files as root via a right click

The following tutorial explains how to add a context menu item that enables a Linux user to open files as the root user when browsing their file system using nautilus. This script feature allows the user to navigate their file system and open or edit any file or directory as the root user of the system. It's a perfect solution for those that are not completely comfortable using terminal commands.

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Making Ubuntu 7.10 – Casper Persistent

Making a casper persistent Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon): With the coming release of Ubuntu 7.10 code named "Gutsy Gibbon", most of the portable linux community is likely going to want to run Ubuntu Gutsy from CD, USB or emulated using Qemu. So it only makes sense that, at the very least, we should be able to save and restore settings changes via a persistent partition or img (image).

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How to make Ubuntu 7.04 Casper Persistent

Making a casper persistent Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn): Since the initial release of Ubuntu 7.04, much of the portable linux community has been eager to run Ubuntu 7.04 persistently from a USB device or emulated using Qemu. It only makes sense that we should be able to save and restore settings changes via a persistent partition or img (image). In the following tutorial, we are simply re-enabling the old casper system.

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Accessing a Linux Ext2 or Ext3 partiton from Windows

How to access a Linux ext2 or ext3 partition from Windows. Do you have files on your Linux system you would like to share with Windows? This is especially useful if you dual boot Windows and Linux on your machine. Maybe you have some mp3's, Video's, Favorites, e-Mail and more you would like to have access to from both operating environments? You no longer have to shut down Windows and boot Linux!

Accessing a Linux partition from Windows is relatively easy to accomplish and can be done via the download of a Free utility called Explore2fs.

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Mounting a Windows XP NTFS partition in Linux

How to access a Windows XP or Vista NTFS partition from Linux. The following tutorial explains how to gain access to a Windows NTFS partition using Linux. Reading or accessing NTFS partitions in Linux is important for many reasons. Some users repair Windows Operating environments using Linux, while others use a dual boot operating environment and would like to have access to their Windows File system.

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Grub Error 21 after full install to USB hard drive

Help! I'm getting a Grub 1.5 Error 21 after a Ubuntu USB hard drive install: We received this email the other day from someone who was trying to do a full Ubuntu Linux install to an external USB hard drive. This person already had Debian Linux installed on their local hard drive and was attempting to do an install of Ubuntu to an external USB hard drive.

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Restore Your USB Key to it's original state

After having tooled around with a USB Linux version using your image overwritten or multi partitioned flash pen drive, you might find it necessary to revert it back to a single fat partition (restore the flash pen drive to it's original state) that can again be read by all computers. Windows users can follow the Windows instructions below to Restore a Flash Drive using the HP USB Format Tool. For those working from Linux this task can easily be accomplished via the Linux Flash Drive Restoration tutorial that follows.

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Create Your Own Live Linux CD or USB distribution

Creating your own custom Live Linux CD or USB distribution is not complicated. However, there are many different approaches depending mainly on which Linux base you decide to use. Many popular Linux distro's such as Knoppix, Ubuntu and DSL are based on Debian so for the following tutorial, we are going to focus on the simple creation of a Live Linux CD using Debian Linux as our base.

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VGA Boot modes to set screen resolution

A simple way to set your screen resolution and color depth for most Live Linux distro's is via the use of the vga=parameter boot option. For example at boot you might type: Live vga=795. This would set your system to boot using the Live label with a screen resolution to 24bit 1280X1024. Here are some more examples of common vga boot values.

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How to clear the terminal command history

Clearing typed commands from terminal history: By default, up to the last 500 command lines a user types in the terminal window are saved into a hidden .bash_history file. The previously typed commands can be readily accessed by using the up and down arrow keys. This makes it easy to retrieve and reuse your recently used commands. However, maybe you want to clear the terminal command history list and start fresh?

This simple tutorial explains the process of viewing and then optionally clearing the terminal history.

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What is the default root password?

Setting the default root password: Some Live Linux distributions are created without a root password by default (the root account is inactive). This is particularly true with Debian based distributions like Ubuntu. Setting a root password enables us to access some essential tools such as the synaptic installer. In most cases, having no root password is fine when your running from a Live CD and don't need to do administration tasks, make changes or install additional packages. But for those of us who do want to make administrative changes and save them back to a USB device or local storage device on for example a properly created "casper-rw" partition. Setting the root password might then be necessary.

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How to find your Linux Kernel Version

Checking your Linux Kernel Version: Once your up and running with your favorite Linux distribution, you might find the need to install additional software packages or drivers. Some of these software applications or drivers can be specific to a Linux Kernel version in which case you will need to find this information. Finding the Kernel Version, Release information and Operating System from a running system is fairly straight forward and can be done directly from a terminal.

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Ubuntu Edgy Beryl installation

This step by step tutorial explains how a user can install Beryl on Ubuntu Edgy. Beryl is a fork of the Compiz desktop window manager. It is an openGL accelerated desktop that allows the Linux user to attain awesome breathtaking special 3D effects with their personal desktop environment. The desktop effects are reminiscent to that of Windows Vista but were established long before Vista's arrival. Beryl uses a graphical user interface and is easy to navigate.

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Understanding the Linux File System

Once you have migrated from Windows to Linux you may notice that the file system is not what your accustomed to. Of the first things the average user needs to understand is the inner workings of the root file system and Linux core directory structure. To help you understand this structure, we have listed each directory explaining what it is commonly used for.

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Ubuntu Linux Shell Commands quick reference

The following is a quick reference list of some useful Ubuntu shell commands along with a short description of common usage. There are more, but this basic list was created to help familiarize the newly introduced Ubuntu user who might be migrating from a Windows operating environment.

*Ubuntu is a product of Canonical Ltd

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